Wednesday, July 11, 2012

BAKKEN MUSEUM & GARDENS, Minneapolis, MN

We have a number of beautiful public gardens in the Twin Cities and the Bakken Museum & Gardens is among them.  Centrally located on the west shore of Lake Calhoun, at the corner of West Calhoun Parkway and 36th Street in Minneapolis, the focus of the museum is on electricity.  While interesting, I was more interested in the mansion itself and the gardens.


The museum is housed in a beautiful English Tudor, European Gothic Revival mansion that was built between 1928 and 1930.  The museum is surrounded by gardens, however, there are four distinct gardens.  The Healthy Heart Organic Garden is a seasonal organic vegetable garden.  The Florence Bakken Medicinal Garden is comprised of plants that were or are used for medicinal purposes.




A wetland area is the setting for the Dakota Native Plants Garden.  Finally, the Green Energy Art Garden is an interactive "sculpture" garden with an educational focus.  This was a photo I took from a large kaleidoscope.


On hot days like today you may want to consider calling a friend and visiting the Bakken Museum and Gardens.  Truly lovely!




For more information go to:  http://www.thebakken.org

1 comment:

  1. You can of course always decorate your home with flowers that don't grow, or wilt either. These were painted by master painters of the past, in Western art history. I found a "garden" full of these flowers at wahooart.com, a company that makes excellent canvas prints, and even hand-painted replicas in oil paint on canvas, from digital images in their large archive for you to choose from.
    I ordered this one online from wahooart.com, http://en.wahooart.com/A55A04/w.nsf/OPRA/BRUE-8LJ5JY , called Flowers by Jan Brueghel the Elder, a Flemish painter of the 16th century, as a present for my dear sister for her birthday, that she now has proudly hanging in her living room. She loves tulips and actually has those growing in the garden now, not far from the framed canvas print.
    She said the print adds "timelessness" to the atmosphere of her living space. That's true, because that beautiful vase of flowers has now stood for 600 years.

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